Materials Needed

Seed – When it comes to seed, there are many sources. Commercial seed companies carry the more common garden varieties of Begonias, usually B. semperflorens or Dragonwing types. American Begonia Society members have access to rarer and more exotic types of...

Where to go from here

About a month or month and a half from that first transplanting, the seedlings should have grown to fill the surface of the tray.  It’s time to move them up again.  At this stage they are running out of food, and are becoming too crowded.  They’ll either just sit...

Transplanting

Although seedlings can be transplanted just as soon as they come up, it is best to wait for them to get larger before transplanting unless you are experienced. When the seedlings first emerge, they have only a pair of equal sized leaves. These are the seedling leaves...

Sowing the Seeds

Sterilize Let’s face it, this is a very important part of the process, but it also depends a lot on what you’re using for soil, and containers. A newly opened bag of germination potting soil is nearly sterile, and new plastic containers are unlikely to be...
Seed Collection and Storage

Seed Collection and Storage

This article is meant as an introduction to collecting Begonia seed, primarily for those who are new to identifying flower parts and collecting seed.  I have only been doing this since early fall, so take this with a grain of salt.  One of the purposes here is to...

Make Your Own Seed!

Growing begonias from seed may seem like something that only commercial growers and experts can do, but it is not. In fact, it is something the Society would like to see everyone succeed with! Whether you are collecting species for conservation, or hybridizing seed to...